New Paths for Computing Humanists

By Ray Siemens1, Gary Shawver2

1. University of Victoria 2. New York University

Digital Humanities is now successfully established as an inter-discipline with local, national, and international import, and remains a vibrant pursuit because of its position at the intersection of fast-paced advances in computation and their...

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Digital Humanities is now successfully established as an inter-discipline with local, national, and international import, and remains a vibrant pursuit because of its position at the intersection of fast-paced advances in computation and their application to the traditional pursuits of the humanities. As a point of intersection between the two, it presents a moving target of the best kind, constantly advancing as computational possibilities evolve and as humanistic focus alters. This collection arises out of a need to revisit that intersection point with some frequency and, in doing so, to map out possible future paths for computer-assisted practices in arts and the humanities. The articles here act as signposts to those futures, and at the same time celebrate and recognize the accomplishments of Ian Lancashire, a Canadian whose internationally significant work within the field of humanities computing has had a profound influence on the application of computer technology to the various disciplinary activities of the arts and humanities.

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Original publication information:

Originally published in Digital Studies/le Champ Numérique

Date: May 13, 2009

DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/dscn.134

License: (CC BY 4.0)

Original citation:
 
Siemens (Editor), R., & Shawver, G. (2009). New Paths for Computing Humanists. Digital Studies/le Champ Numérique, 1(1). DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/dscn.134